Friday, 19 October 2018

Dusty Corners Corner

The first instalment of a new series of songs about corners.

I was originally just looking for something to play alongside Errol Scorcher's masterpiece, a record I've loved every since I first found the 12" version at a car boot sale in Cambridgeshire nearly 40 years ago. Then I discovered I had more "corner" songs in my collection than I had realised. We'll start with the reggae ones and see where we get to.

"Fire Corner" - King Stitt

"Lover's Corner" - Yellowman

"Roach In De Corner" - Errol Scorcher

Tuesday, 16 October 2018

The Lads Who Would Give Them Hard Clouts

For the second time in the last few months, I spent yesterday evening at the Barbican listening to a bunch of Irishmen revisiting one of their landmark moments. Last time out it was Microdisney performing "The Clock Comes Down The Stairs". This time it was Andy Irvine and Paul Brady and their eponymous album from 1977, which is widely - and rightly - regarded as one of the classic Irish folk albums.


Andy and Paul are both in their seventies now, but you wouldn't know it because they are both sounding as good as ever. They were ably supported by the backing musicians from the original album, Donal Lunny and Kevin Burke, both fairly legendary figures in their own right.

We were treated to two full sets, a selection from their respective solo careers in the first half and then the whole album after the break. Inevitably, "Arthur McBride" was the stand-out moment, but the show was excellent from start to finish.

Here's one track apiece from Andy and Paul from the original album, plus as a bonus "The Cocks Are Crowing" from Paul's most recent album, "Unfinished Business" - one of the highlights of the first set.

"Mary And The Soldier" - Andy Irvine and Paul Brady

"Streets Of Derry" - Andy Irvine and Paul Brady

"The Cocks Are Crowing" - Paul Brady

Sunday, 14 October 2018

Tsonga Tsunday

We have persisted with the claim in the header that we are "bringing Tsonga Disco to the masses" even though it hasn't really been true for a long time. It's not been a conscious decision, more to do with my access to new supplies of Tsonga Disco being more limited these days and there being so many more marvellous types of music to share with you.

But today we're going back to our roots with a couple of tracks from Armandinho, about whom I know nothing at all apart from the fact that he is from the Mozambique branch of the Tsonga nation. My guess would be that these tracks are 15-20 years old, but that is only a guess.

"Rendzeveta" - Armandinho

"Ta Vuyia" - Armandinho

Tuesday, 9 October 2018

Choral Works

Does anyone else out there remember Frazier Chorus? I must confess I had forgotten all about them until I found a copy of their debut album, 1989's "Sue", in a local charity shop recently.

It is a bit samey but very nice. The two stand-out tracks concerns kitchens and living rooms. Just think what they could have achieved with a concept album covering every room in the house.

Fun fact: According to Wikipedia, lead singer Tim Freeman is the older brother of Martin of "The Office", "The Hobbit" and "Sherlock" fame. Hence today's clip.

"Dream Kitchen" - Frazier Chorus

"Living Room" - Frazier Chorus

Saturday, 6 October 2018

Saturday Siren 1

I'm calling this post 'Saturday Siren 1' in the hope that it will encourage me to start a regular series of posts featuring feisty female vocalists. On past form it won't work, but let's see.

Kicking off, and possibly also closing, the series is the magnificent Croatian singer Josipa Lisac. Both tracks come from her 1973 debut album "Dnevnik Jedne Ljubavi" ("The Diary of a Love").

"Sreća" - Josipa Lisac

"Po Prvi Put" - Josipa Lisac

Wednesday, 3 October 2018

Ssing Ssong

I've been to some weird and wonderful gigs this year, and last night's rates pretty highly on both counts.

I was at London's fashionable South Bank to see Ssing Ssing, a Korean ensemble who describe themselves thus: "We define the band's genre as alternative Minyo rock, Minyo referring to Korean folk music which is characterised by an emphasis on strong vocal lines and lyrics that sing about peasant lives".

Which is all very well, but it doesn't really prepare you for the sight (and sound) of two men in drag and a small but very noisy woman in a shiny skirt wailing, leaping and cavorting round the stage while the three musicians behind them crank out everything from disco and ska to doom metal. I really have no idea what was going on but it was bloody marvellous. You should go and see them if you get the chance.


I have added a bonus track. Ssing Ssing have no connection to the similarly spelt prison, but you should not need a reason to enjoy the Fabulous Fezettes.

"Cheongchunga" - Ssing Ssing

"Sashiraengyisori" - Ssing Ssing

"99 Years In Sing-Sing" - The Fire Hydrant Men With The Fabulous Fezettes

From Sing Sing to song sung...

Sunday, 30 September 2018

Four Karens

After the Roys, the Karens. No particular reason other than that Ms Matheson popped up on the old shuffle, I thought we could use her as the inspiration and starting point for today's post, and I don't have any other Mathesons in my collection.

"Puirt A Beal (Mouth Music)" - Karen Matheson

"You Just Gotta Know My Mind" - Karen Verros

"To Get You Back Again" - Karen Small

"Something On Your Mind" - Karen Dalton